No energy Ma!

This is noteworthy because they are achieving useful behavior at room temperature from electrons. One can imagine processors that absorb far less energy than ever achieved. Other applications are yet to be imagined but zero energy protocols has got to lead to something.

It is worth wondering if this can help model the odd character of amorphous metals known as metglas. It was speculated some years back there that electron flow was along the surface.

And while we are at it, could we convert incoming heat into direct electron flow. The metglas phenomena suggested experiments along those lines. Just a thought and I am sure there are plenty of objections and difficulty. However, the unusual behaviors been recounted make these type of speculations not entirely far fetched.

June 16, 2009

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_VyTCyizqrHs/SjiM7glDExI/AAAAAAAAEAs/GneBZzzVrU4/s1600-h/bismuthtelluride.jpg



Surface electron band structure of bismuth telluride. (Image courtesy of Yulin Chen and Z. X. Shen.)

Bismuth Telluride allows electrons on its surface to travel with no loss of energy at room temperatures and can be fabricated using existing semiconductor technologies. Such material could provide a leap in microchip speeds, and even become the bedrock of an entirely new kind of computing industry based on spintronics, the next evolution of electronics. The experimenters examined bismuth telluride samples using X-rays from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource at SLAC and the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National
Laboratory. When Chen and his colleagues investigated the electrons' behavior, they saw the clear signature of a topological insulator. Not only that, the group discovered that the reality of bismuth telluride was even better than theory. "The theorists were very close," Chen said, "but there was a quantitative difference." The experiments showed that bismuth telluride could tolerate even higher temperatures than theorists had predicted. "This means that the material is closer to application than we thought," Chen said. This magic is possible thanks to surprisingly well-behaved electrons. The quantum spin of each electron is aligned with the electron's motion—a phenomenon called the quantum spin Hall effect. This alignment is a key component in creating spintronics devices, new kinds of devices that go beyond standard electronics. "When you hit something, there's usually scattering, some possibility of bouncing back," explained theorist Xiaoliang Qi. "But the quantum spin Hall effect means that you can't reflect to exactly the reverse path." As a dramatic consequence, electrons flow without resistance. Put a voltage on a topological insulator, and this special spin current will flow without heating the material or dissipating. Topological insulators aren't conventional superconductors nor fodder for super-efficient power lines, as they can only carry small currents, but they could pave the way for a paradigm shift in microchip development. "This could lead to new applications of spintronics, or using the electron spin to carry information," Qi said. "Whether or not it can build better wires, I'm optimistic it can lead to new devices, transistors, and spintronics devices." Fortunately for real-world applications, bismuth telluride is fairly simple to grow and work with. Chen said, "It's a three-dimensional material, so it's easy to fabricate with the current mature semiconductor technology. It's also easy to dope—you can tune the properties relatively easily."

No comments:

Post a Comment